Great white sharks are moving to Florida for the winter

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This undated photo made available by The Pew Charitable Trusts shows the mako shark swimming in the Atlantic Ocean off Rhode Island. Countries have agreed to protect more than a dozen shark species at risk of extinction, in a move aimed at conserving some of the ocean’s most awe-inspiring creatures who have themselves become prey to commercial fishing and the Chinese appetite for shark fin soup. Three proposals covering the international trade of 18 types of mako sharks, wedgefishes and guitarfishes each passed with a needed two-thirds majority in a committee of the World Wildlife Conference known as CITES on Sunday Aug. 25, 2019. (Matthew D Potenski/The Pew Charitable Trusts via AP)

KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) — Like snowbirds, there’s another group that’s moving to Florida for the winter: sharks.

Shark experts say the coast of Florida is starting to heat up with white shark activity.

OCSEARCH, a research group, says the annual migration to warmer waters off the Florida and Carolinas coasts is underway.

The Palm Beach Post reports that eight white sharks tagged by the Utah-based research group were spotted from New Jersey to Florida in the last week.

Three other sharks that had been tagged were detected Wednesday in waters on North Carolina beaches, and two more sharks —Helena and the 2,076-pound Unama’ki —made their presence known with toothy grins just west of Key West in September.

Unama’ki had been tagged off Nova Scotia in September. She’s a big girl —some 15-feet, 5-inches.

It’s not unusual for great whites to call southern waters home during winter and sightings are common near popular fishing and diving spots in Florida through spring.

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