ETSU students featured in CNN video on democratic socialism

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JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (WJHL) – Students from East Tennessee State University were recently featured on a CNN video about young people leaning toward socialism in the U.S.

The interviews took place during the Young Democratic Socialists of America winter conference in Chicago with co-founders of ETSU’s chapter, Austin Cable and Connor McClelland, representing Bernie Sander’s movement in the Appalachian region.

News Channel 11 spoke to the chapter’s chair Austin Cable, a senior at ETSU, who said the coverage not only helps the national effort to support Sander’s campaign, but also boosts the local movement for democratic socialism.

“We took 12 members, and every single member came back ready to fight for democratic socialism and ready to fight on campus for a better future for everyone,” Cable said.

“Even conservatives recognize that we are actually fighting for something rather than against something. I think where we differ from a lot of traditional democrats in this area is that they’re fighting against Trump. I don’t think that’s how you win people over.

“I think you win people over by fighting for something — by fighting for Medicare for All, by fighting for a New Green Deal to save our planet, by fighting for college for all to make college free and to cancel all student debt.

“When you fight for something, then people will hop on because they actually believe in what you’re saying.”

Other members of the YDSA at ETSU were also interviewed, including Aria Inaba and Carson Morgan.

According to Cable, the ETSU chapter will prepare for Super Tuesday by continuing to canvass the region and phone bank.

The group recently traveled to South Carolina before the primary election Saturday to campaign for Sanders.

To learn more about ETSU’s YDSA chapter, visit their Twitter page.

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